TPI Preservation Awards Celebration

PreservationCelebration2


Preservation Awards Ceremony Registration



Tampa Preservation, Inc. invites you to attend the 29th Annual Preservation Celebration on Thursday, October 30th, 2014. Preservation Awards begin at 7:00 pm followed by a Reception at the Seminole Heights Garden Center, 5800 Central Avenue, Tampa, FL. Registration is $10 per person for current TPI members, $25 per person for non-members.

Please RSVP by October 24th by mailing check payable to TPI to P.O. Box 18061 Tampa, FL 33679 or online at www.tampapreservation.com

Call 248-5437 for more info.

Continue reading “TPI Preservation Awards Celebration”

Preservation Roundtable – August 2014

TPI color LogoHope everyone has been having a good summer – time to start getting back into the swing!
The Preservation Roundtable will meet on Wednesday, August 6th at 9:00 AM at the offices of TPI/Ybor Museum Society – corner of Palm Avenue and 18th St. (Angel Oliva Sr. Drive). in Ybor City.
Hope to see you there!

Mafia Tour of Ybor City

Scott M. Deitche, author of 5 books on the mob including, Cigar City Mafia and The Silent Don: The Criminal Underworld of Santo Trafficante Jr., will lead a two hour long jaunt through Tampa’s Mafia history. The tour will take you to old gambling palaces, street corners and alleys where some mobsters met their demise, and restaurants where wise guys like famed boss Santo Trafficante Jr. held court. Sponsored by Cigar City Magazine, this one-of-a-kind walk through Tampa’s most storied neighborhood. They guarantee you’ll never look at Ybor City the same way again.

Tour Dates:

January 12 | February 16 | March 9 | April 6

The tour starts off from King Corona at 1523 East 7th Avenue in Ybor City.
Tickets must be purchased one day prior to the event.

To book your tour, go to the Cigar City Magazine website.

Grant Writing Workshops

The West Tampa Community Development Corporation and The National Institute for Strategic and Tactical Planning will host a free professional grant writing workshop in basic grant writing on:

  • January 19 , 2013 from 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm at West Tampa Library – 2312 West Union Street, Tampa, FL 33607.
  • January 25 , 2013 from 2:00 pm to 3:30 pm at the Children’s Board of Hillsborough County, 1002 E. Palm Avenue, Tampa, FL 33605.
  • January 31 , 2013 from 2:00 pm to 3:30 pm at the Children’s Board of Hillsborough County, 1002 E. Palm Avenue, Tampa, FL 33605.

(All classes are the same)

WHO SHOULD ATTEND

Staff, administrators, board members of non-profits, faith based organizations, government agencies and other tax-exempt status organizations.

Learn How To:

  • Describe the different types of grants
  • Describe the different types of grantors
  • Identify research tools available to the grant seeker
  • Describe the fundamental of grant writing
  • Describe the proposal writing process
  • Describe concept paper, letter of Intent, and letter of inquiry process
  • Identify grant terms

For more information, contact Michael Randolph at 813-857-7657. Seating is limited; please e-mail wefindgrants@aol.com to confirm a seat and to attain an invitation and workshop packet. No one will be admitted without an invitation. (Please give date you plan to attend.)

Historic Homes Workshop 2012

Join Tampa Preservation, Inc. on April 14, 2012 for the 2nd annual FREE Historic Homes Workshop. The one day series of workshops offers tips and advice to owners of historic homes looking to restore their property including topics like Repairing Historic Wood Windows, Refinishing Wood Floors, Making Your Home More Energy Efficient, Florida Friendly Landscaping, Researching Your Home’s History, Painting Your Historic Home and Restoring Your Porch. This year the event takes place at the historic Seminole Heights United Methodist Church from 10 am to 4 pm.

The series of 12 workshops will run 3 at a time so you will have to plan accordingly. The schedule is posted below. Food will be available at the event site.

Event sponsors include: Through the Woods Fine Wood Floors, Wood Window Makeover and Historic Shed.
Historic Homes Workshop Tampa

WORKSHOP SCHEDULE

Track 1- 10:30-11:20
ROOM 1:  Energy Efficiency in Historic Homes by Jo-Anne Peck of Historic Shed
ROOM 2: Researching Your Homes History by Lucy Jones of Cardno ENTRIX
ROOM 3: Painting to Preserve and Protect by Jett Tanner of the Tanner Paint Company

Track 2- 11:30-12:20
OUTSIDE: Repairing and Refinishing Wood Floors by Dennis Prieur of Through the Wood Fine Wood Floors
ROOM 1: Exterior Details by Alan Dobbs of Florida Design Studio
ROOM 2: Living in a Historic District by Dennis Fernandez of the City of Tampa, Historic Preservation

Lunch 12:30-1:30

Track 3- 1:30-2:20
OUTSIDE: Built-ins and Trim by Brian Manne, Carpenter
ROOM 1: Florida Friendly Native Landscaping by Michael Manlowe of Twigs and Leaves
ROOM 2: Preservation: Past, Present and Future by Becky Clarke of Tampa Preservation, Inc.

Track 4- 2:30-3:20
OUTSIDE: Restoring Your Old Wood Windows by Steve Quilian of Wood Window Makeover
ROOM 2: Salvaged Wood / Goodwin Heart Pine by Carol Goodwin of Goodwin Heart Pine
ROOM 3: Lessons Learned / Illustrated Intro to the Secretary of Interior Standards by Kim & Richard Headland, Architects


When you think of historic buildings at risk, visions of heritage train stations, courthouses and other culturally significant buildings come to mind. And sadly, every day these magnificent structures do face the wrecking ball. But, on a smaller, but no less important scale, is the loss of pieces of our own neighborhood history, due to the lack of knowledge of their value and the lack of skill for their care. Wood windows, original flooring and built-in bookcases are demolished every day, destroying architectural features and beauty and reducing home values.

Tampa Preservation, Inc., a private, non-profit organization, established in 1973., is dedicated to the preservation of the historic structures and neighborhoods of the Tampa Bay area and Hillsborough County, and to the education of the  area’s school children and residents about their unique heritage.

TPI’s Historic Home Workshops provide tips from over a dozen experts on how to save these historic materials. This
year’s event will be held at the Historic Seminole Heights United Methodist Church, 6111 N Central Ave on Saturday, April 14 10 am and end at 4 pm. This church, located on the southeast corner of Hanna and Central Avenues was built in 1927 and has its own story of revitalization. Admission to the workshop is free.

“Historic homeowners often wish to take a hands-on approach to restoring their houses. This workshop will offer
information on some of the skills required,” observes Becky Clarke, TPI President. “The homeowner who wishes to hire professionals will come away more educated on what is available and how to best utilize restoration experts.”

Kim and Richard Headland, two architects who own a bungalow in VM Ybor will talk about the mistakes that can be made in renovating an old house and how to rectify some of the worst horrors. Plenty of photographs and personal experience will lead attendees through some lesser known facts on how to restore a home in a manner that is historically appropriate and retains its value, while allowing for modern conveniences.

Other topics to be covered are landscaping, restoring wood windows and refinishing wood floors. Each will provide
information learned from the speakers’ many years of experience.

Last year’s premier event opened with a line of people standing out into the street. Attendees were enthusiastic about
applying what they learned. Their only complaint was that the venue was too small. We have remedied it this year. There will be space for all!

The event will start at 10 am and end at 4 pm. Three workshops will be presented every hour, with a break at for lunch and a chance to chat with the displayers and fellow attendees, and view historic photos from Steve and Mario of The Tampa Natives Show.

Sign Up to be Notified of Upcoming Workshops

* required

*

Email Marketing by VerticalResponse

Tampa’s Streetcar System

Tampa StreetcarTampa’s first streetcar system began in 1885, when the Tampa Street Railway Company ran a wood-burning engine with several small cars over a track from downtown Tampa to the neighboring town of Ybor City. The creation of this early transit line helped further Tampa’s rapid growth and development that took place at the end of the nineteenth century.

Tampa’s streetcar line soon became electrified, thanks to Frank Sprague of Richmond, Virginia, who developed a four-wheeled “troller” that ran along an overhead wire and transmitted electricity to streetcars. This new power source opened the door for private electric companies to enter into the transportation business. In 1892, the Tampa Street Railway Company merged with the Florida Electric Company to form the Tampa Street Railway and Power Company.

Tampa’s original trolley company quickly encountered competition. In April 1892, the Tampa Suburban Company was formed by a group of local entrepreneurs, including Peter O. Knight, who realized the growing commercial potential of the city as a result of the opening of the luxurious Tampa Bay Hotel across the Hillsborough River in West Tampa. In an effort to forestall competition, the Tampa Street Railway and Power Company secured an injunction to prevent operation of the Suburban lines. With an appeal pending, backers of the Suburban Company organized a new corporation, selling stock to local citizens. The Consumers Electric Light and Street Railway Company soon became the dominant trolley system in Tampa by winning a rate war against its rival, which it bought out on June 18, 1894. After some financial disputes and trouble with stockholders, Consumers went into receivership, and in 1899, it became what is today Tampa Electric Company.

In its early years, the company operated just over 21 miles of tracks with main lines extending to Ybor City, West Tampa and Ballast Point. At its peak, 190 streetcars covered Tampa’s 53 miles of streetcar lines along 11 routes. The streetcars ran from 4:30 a.m. to 2:00 a.m. every day.

The streetcar served a purpose beyond workday transportation. A 1940s map and schedule of the Tampa Street Car System requests that shoppers avoid the rush hour periods. Resorts and parks operated by street railway companies, known as “electric parks,” were established in cities throughout the United States. In Tampa, the recreational venues DeSoto Park, Ballast Point Park and Pier, MacFarlane Park, and the Sulphur Springs Pool were developed at the extremities of the streetcar lines. In addition to public parks, Tampa Electric Company also built the original Fortune Street and Garcia Avenue bridges and contributed funding to the construction of the current Fortune Street (now Laurel Street) and Lafayette Street (now Kennedy Boulevard) bridges.

Tampa’s streetcar reached its peak of popularity in the 1920s. The system carried almost 24 million passengers in 1926. Tampa’s streetcar ridership remained high during World War II, when gas and rubber rationing limited automobile and bus travel. But the end of World War II also brought the end of streetcar service in Tampa. Residents had long complained that streetcars were noisy and hampered the flow of auto and bus traffic. Bus systems were also promoted as cheaper and more practical for public transportation. Tampa Electric Company had been operating its streetcar system at a loss for many years, since it never raised its fare above the original five-cents (two-and-a-half cents for school children). In August 1946, the last Tampa Electric Company streetcar made its final run. Bus service took over former streetcar routes.Tampa Trolley

In October 2002, Tampa Electric Company began running six historical replica streetcars along a new 2.4-mile line, connecting Ybor City, the Channel District, and the Tampa Convention Center. A 1/3-mile extension is under construction, running along Franklin Street to the parking garages at Whiting Street.

Images courtesy the Florida State Archives.